Dealing with radicalisation

If you are concerned that your child is at risks of being radicalised get advice on the practical things you can do to safeguard them from potential harm.

What’s on the page?

What steps to take to support your child

What to do if you are concerned a child is in danger
Display video transcript
If you believe a child is in immediate danger, a threat to others or there is a risk they may leave the country, contact the police who will discuss your concerns and work with you to offer ways to protect the child

You can report any concerns about online grooming to the National Crime Agency’s CEOP Command

If your child is not immediate danger, tThere are also a number of organisations that can help with one to one advice and support for you and your children if your child is not immediate danger. You can also call 101 to talk to someone.

What action should I take if your child has been radicalised?

If you feel your child – or another child – may be in immediate danger, a threat to others or there is a risk they may leave the country, contact the police and ensure that their passport is kept in a safe place.

You can report any concerns about online grooming to the National Crime Agency’s CEOP Command.

Resource document

Advice from Educate Against Hate if you have a concern that your child has been radicalised.

Visit site

Do’s

Speak to your child calmly and try to understand why they have adopted these views and use counter narratives to delegitimise them.

Teach yourself the basics of IT safety, either by engaging in material online eg. Parent Info or by taking a skills training course such as our unique Web Guardians™ programme which teaches mothers a range of things as well as how to spot signs of radicalisation.

Develop strong counter narratives with which you can delegitimise the logic used by extremist groups.

Recognise the threats faced today are very different to what you experienced in your youth, specifically online safety.

In the case of Islamic extremism, if you believe they plan to travel to join ISIS, keep their passport in a safe place and notify the authorities.

Invite support from other adults they may respect, for example, if you are dealing with Islamic extremism, get in contact with a trusted imam to discredit the ideology of ISIS.

Don’ts

Get angry or become confrontational

Openly threaten to report them

Try to stop them from using all phones or computers. This is not a long term solution and may encourage them to reach out to recruiters in person.

Feel like you are spying or ‘turning in’ your child, they have been specifically targeted by extremists seeking to groom and brain wash them, by monitoring whether or not your child is becoming radicalised you are trying to protect them from harm, or from harming others.